Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel M3 Prices Dip Slightly Despite Solid Demand

Industry News 12:01:11PM May 11, 2016 Source:SMM

by Lisa Reisman on MAY 10, 2016

The MetalMiner monthly GOES MMI reading dipped slightly from 202 to 195 against smaller import volumes. Market participants report to MetalMiner that grain-oriented electrical steel prices have fallen a bit in China, as well, though non-grain-oriented electrical steels have increased.

However, AK Steel did add a surcharge of $65 per metric ton effective with June orders, the first higher surcharge since January.

According to recent comments made by Roger Newport, CEO of AK Steel, demand appears solid for high-efficiency electrical steel. He also pointed to stronger housing starts, though they remain below historical norms. In addition, Newport indicated the new transformer efficiency standards would help with overall demand. AK Steel also received a boost when ATI closed its Bagdad facility in Gilpin, Pa., driving approximately 35,000 tons of new business to AK Steel.

Steel Rising

In the meantime, the steel market price rise, in general, appears more supply-driven as opposed to demand-driven. Many have questioned whether any more new demand will appear during the second half of the year which means that for prices to stay supported, producers will need to remain vigilant about managing capacity. Some believe prices will flatten during the summer and then start slipping toward the end of the year.

Although GOES markets don’t closely correlate with underlying steel markets, some of the drivers of steel prices also apply to electrical steel. These drivers include: China’s ability to hold prices higher (we have started to see some cracks in that foundation). Unlike in the U.S., Chinese producers work together to set market prices, a recovery in products and materials used in the oil and gas industry on the basis of a rising oil price and, finally, the overall health of commodities markets and base metal prices.

Source: MetalMiner


Key Words:  steel prices    
Relative News

Grain-Oriented Electrical Steel M3 Prices Dip Slightly Despite Solid Demand

Industry News 12:01:11PM May 11, 2016 Source:SMM

by Lisa Reisman on MAY 10, 2016

The MetalMiner monthly GOES MMI reading dipped slightly from 202 to 195 against smaller import volumes. Market participants report to MetalMiner that grain-oriented electrical steel prices have fallen a bit in China, as well, though non-grain-oriented electrical steels have increased.

However, AK Steel did add a surcharge of $65 per metric ton effective with June orders, the first higher surcharge since January.

According to recent comments made by Roger Newport, CEO of AK Steel, demand appears solid for high-efficiency electrical steel. He also pointed to stronger housing starts, though they remain below historical norms. In addition, Newport indicated the new transformer efficiency standards would help with overall demand. AK Steel also received a boost when ATI closed its Bagdad facility in Gilpin, Pa., driving approximately 35,000 tons of new business to AK Steel.

Steel Rising

In the meantime, the steel market price rise, in general, appears more supply-driven as opposed to demand-driven. Many have questioned whether any more new demand will appear during the second half of the year which means that for prices to stay supported, producers will need to remain vigilant about managing capacity. Some believe prices will flatten during the summer and then start slipping toward the end of the year.

Although GOES markets don’t closely correlate with underlying steel markets, some of the drivers of steel prices also apply to electrical steel. These drivers include: China’s ability to hold prices higher (we have started to see some cracks in that foundation). Unlike in the U.S., Chinese producers work together to set market prices, a recovery in products and materials used in the oil and gas industry on the basis of a rising oil price and, finally, the overall health of commodities markets and base metal prices.

Source: MetalMiner


Key Words:  steel prices