China Ministry: No Land For Polluting, Overproducing Industries-Shanghai Metals Market

Hot Keywords

  • Inventory data
  • Air pollution
  • Zinc
  • Aluminium
  • hydrogenation stations
  • Production data
  • Futures movement
  • Copper
  • nickel laterite
  • Nickel
  • Market commentary
  • Macroeconomics
  • In the United States
  • Nickel ore
  • Spot copper

China Ministry: No Land For Polluting, Overproducing Industries

Data Analysis 02:37:01PM May 27, 2010 Source:SMM

BEIJING, May 27 -- Industries that pollute, consume too much energy or overproduce won't be allocated land for new projects or project expansions, the Ministry of Land and Resources said.

The ministry will close companies that conduct mining without proper permits and those that pollute the environment, it said in a statement on its website Wednesday.

The statement underlines existing curbs on China's sprawling metals and mining sector, including steel and aluminum, under which the government has already ordered a three-year-moratorium on new capacity in a years-long campaign to force consolidation in and clean up the industry.

The government regularly lists targets for specific companies to shut down obsolete, polluting and energy-consuming capacity.

But analysts have widely noted that the campaign is slow-going at best. Such projects, on which local government revenues often depend, are often built and operated without approval; shut down when detected by central government authorities and restarted when attention fades.

 

Key Words:  Macro control policy 

China Ministry: No Land For Polluting, Overproducing Industries

Data Analysis 02:37:01PM May 27, 2010 Source:SMM

BEIJING, May 27 -- Industries that pollute, consume too much energy or overproduce won't be allocated land for new projects or project expansions, the Ministry of Land and Resources said.

The ministry will close companies that conduct mining without proper permits and those that pollute the environment, it said in a statement on its website Wednesday.

The statement underlines existing curbs on China's sprawling metals and mining sector, including steel and aluminum, under which the government has already ordered a three-year-moratorium on new capacity in a years-long campaign to force consolidation in and clean up the industry.

The government regularly lists targets for specific companies to shut down obsolete, polluting and energy-consuming capacity.

But analysts have widely noted that the campaign is slow-going at best. Such projects, on which local government revenues often depend, are often built and operated without approval; shut down when detected by central government authorities and restarted when attention fades.

 

Key Words:  Macro control policy