How can an iPhone vibrate when tungsten resources are in a hurry?-Shanghai Metals Market

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How can an iPhone vibrate when tungsten resources are in a hurry?

Translation 12:49:34PM May 10, 2019 Source:Medium tungsten online

SMM: every company that specializes in mobile phones, computers, watches and televisions needs these, but some of them are likely to run out in the next half century.

These materials include tungsten, gold, tantalum, aluminum, cobalt, copper, lithium, tin, zinc, steel, glass, paper, plastic and other raw materials. that. If some of these materials are really missing, what will happen?

Without tungsten, watches and mobile phones will not be able to vibrate because their vibrators are made of tungsten alloy! If the phone is missing tungsten alloy vibrator, our world, either, henceforth, mute; or, one after another, are ringtones. It's a little bad, but it's not the most annoying. Because of the lack of tin in circuit board welding, the computer shell needs to be made of aluminum, and cobalt is used in the new battery. If there are no alternative materials, put aside the world civilization, it can be imagined that many people may have a hard time, most of them can not do without mobile phones, computers, watches, televisions.

As a result, this may be a material storm sweeping the world, and the crisis is not ignored. As one of the world's largest handset makers, Apple naturally cannot stay out of it. Last year alone, Apple sold more than 200 million phones, according to data. After more than a decade of development, coupled with sales this year, the total sales of iPhones are likely to exceed 1. 5 billion, which means that the shipments of iPhones are enough to circle the earth more than 13 times. At the same time, however, iPhones also produce a lot of e-waste.

According to a United Nations report, more than 40 million tons of e-waste were generated worldwide in 2016, but only about 20% of electronic materials were recycled.

There are reports that Apple wants to create a "closed loop" for recycled products. This means that after receiving the devices, Apple will either renovate them into new products for use by consumers, or recycle the materials and use them again for new devices. There are also reports that last year, Apple received about 9 million iPhone, from customers, 1.2 million of which were handed over to Daisy, trying to correct some of the mistakes, while the rest were refurbished and sent to new users. However, the cost of refurbishing the equipment is too high. That's why Daisy exists. Who's Daisy? For what?

Some say Daisy is the most interesting robot in the world. She stays in Apple's electronics recycling lab and is designed to reuse the "dead" iPhone, that is, to disassemble them and peel off the parts. Recovery of copper, aluminum, cobalt and other raw materials for reuse.

The Daisy is 10 meters long, has five robotic arms, can disassemble iPhone phones at a speed of 200 per hour, and can easily disassemble 15 different models of iPhone. Not long ago, it appeared in front of everyone, sometimes methodically, sometimes violently and violently removed the phone screen, batteries, screws, sensors, logic boards and wireless charging coils, leaving only the aluminum shell.

Of course, Apple is not the only company with strong environmental projects, but the number of such companies is not large, for example, Dell, the world's third-largest personal computer maker, HP, the world's second-largest personal computer maker, Lenovo, the world's largest computer maker, and Samsung, the world's largest mobile phone maker.

But while these companies are good at developing products, they are not good at reverse action to bring them back to smelters around the world, according to researchers at the World Resources Institute. Moreover, these technology giants still have a long way to go to eliminate the waste caused by their customers to the world.

So Apple encourages people not to leave unused devices idle, but to return them to Apple so that they will not be wasted or thrown into landfills.

If, one day, some fruit powder tells the apple, "Hey, I have a way to extract cobalt and tungsten from the battery." This is a huge business opportunity. Then it is highly likely that Apple will pay for it. In response, some netizens said, "the Apple brand will do so because they and their users are very concerned about the environment."

Key Words:  Tungsten  apples  small metals  tin 

How can an iPhone vibrate when tungsten resources are in a hurry?

Translation 12:49:34PM May 10, 2019 Source:Medium tungsten online

SMM: every company that specializes in mobile phones, computers, watches and televisions needs these, but some of them are likely to run out in the next half century.

These materials include tungsten, gold, tantalum, aluminum, cobalt, copper, lithium, tin, zinc, steel, glass, paper, plastic and other raw materials. that. If some of these materials are really missing, what will happen?

Without tungsten, watches and mobile phones will not be able to vibrate because their vibrators are made of tungsten alloy! If the phone is missing tungsten alloy vibrator, our world, either, henceforth, mute; or, one after another, are ringtones. It's a little bad, but it's not the most annoying. Because of the lack of tin in circuit board welding, the computer shell needs to be made of aluminum, and cobalt is used in the new battery. If there are no alternative materials, put aside the world civilization, it can be imagined that many people may have a hard time, most of them can not do without mobile phones, computers, watches, televisions.

As a result, this may be a material storm sweeping the world, and the crisis is not ignored. As one of the world's largest handset makers, Apple naturally cannot stay out of it. Last year alone, Apple sold more than 200 million phones, according to data. After more than a decade of development, coupled with sales this year, the total sales of iPhones are likely to exceed 1. 5 billion, which means that the shipments of iPhones are enough to circle the earth more than 13 times. At the same time, however, iPhones also produce a lot of e-waste.

According to a United Nations report, more than 40 million tons of e-waste were generated worldwide in 2016, but only about 20% of electronic materials were recycled.

There are reports that Apple wants to create a "closed loop" for recycled products. This means that after receiving the devices, Apple will either renovate them into new products for use by consumers, or recycle the materials and use them again for new devices. There are also reports that last year, Apple received about 9 million iPhone, from customers, 1.2 million of which were handed over to Daisy, trying to correct some of the mistakes, while the rest were refurbished and sent to new users. However, the cost of refurbishing the equipment is too high. That's why Daisy exists. Who's Daisy? For what?

Some say Daisy is the most interesting robot in the world. She stays in Apple's electronics recycling lab and is designed to reuse the "dead" iPhone, that is, to disassemble them and peel off the parts. Recovery of copper, aluminum, cobalt and other raw materials for reuse.

The Daisy is 10 meters long, has five robotic arms, can disassemble iPhone phones at a speed of 200 per hour, and can easily disassemble 15 different models of iPhone. Not long ago, it appeared in front of everyone, sometimes methodically, sometimes violently and violently removed the phone screen, batteries, screws, sensors, logic boards and wireless charging coils, leaving only the aluminum shell.

Of course, Apple is not the only company with strong environmental projects, but the number of such companies is not large, for example, Dell, the world's third-largest personal computer maker, HP, the world's second-largest personal computer maker, Lenovo, the world's largest computer maker, and Samsung, the world's largest mobile phone maker.

But while these companies are good at developing products, they are not good at reverse action to bring them back to smelters around the world, according to researchers at the World Resources Institute. Moreover, these technology giants still have a long way to go to eliminate the waste caused by their customers to the world.

So Apple encourages people not to leave unused devices idle, but to return them to Apple so that they will not be wasted or thrown into landfills.

If, one day, some fruit powder tells the apple, "Hey, I have a way to extract cobalt and tungsten from the battery." This is a huge business opportunity. Then it is highly likely that Apple will pay for it. In response, some netizens said, "the Apple brand will do so because they and their users are very concerned about the environment."

Key Words:  Tungsten  apples  small metals  tin