Taiwanese Containerized Scrap import prices gain drastically to $247 a ton

Industry News 09:25:45AM May 06, 2016 Source:SMM

TAIWAN May 05 2016 5:36 PM

TAIPEI (Scrap Register): Prices for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS # 1&2 80:20 gained drastically during the week ended April 15, as per the latest figures from The Steel Index. 

According to TSI, prices for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS #1&2 80:20 increased by $23 a ton to $247 a ton CFR Taiwanese port during the week. 

Offer prices of imported ISRI grade scrap were changing almost daily this week. The situation was that once an offer was accepted by the buyers, a new, higher offer was available the following day. 

Mills were seen to be trying to buy whatever they could from overseas suppliers, as well as the domestic market. 

However, there were mills that still did not want to commit to buying as they were wary of the sustainability of the high prices.

Domestic rebar prices were still considered low compared to imported scrap as local stockists are known to have stopped buying.

(This article is compiled by Vibin Antony on behalf of Scrap Register. Send in your suggestions and comments to editor@scrapregister.com)


Taiwanese Containerized Scrap import prices gain drastically to $247 a ton

Industry News 09:25:45AM May 06, 2016 Source:SMM

TAIWAN May 05 2016 5:36 PM

TAIPEI (Scrap Register): Prices for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS # 1&2 80:20 gained drastically during the week ended April 15, as per the latest figures from The Steel Index. 

According to TSI, prices for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS #1&2 80:20 increased by $23 a ton to $247 a ton CFR Taiwanese port during the week. 

Offer prices of imported ISRI grade scrap were changing almost daily this week. The situation was that once an offer was accepted by the buyers, a new, higher offer was available the following day. 

Mills were seen to be trying to buy whatever they could from overseas suppliers, as well as the domestic market. 

However, there were mills that still did not want to commit to buying as they were wary of the sustainability of the high prices.

Domestic rebar prices were still considered low compared to imported scrap as local stockists are known to have stopped buying.

(This article is compiled by Vibin Antony on behalf of Scrap Register. Send in your suggestions and comments to editor@scrapregister.com)