Taiwanese containerized scrap import prices plummet to $160 a ton-Shanghai Metals Market

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Taiwanese containerized scrap import prices plummet to $160 a ton

Industry News 05:56:40PM Sep 21, 2015 Source:SMM

TAIWAN September 21 2015 12:01 PM

TAIPEI (Scrap Register): Prices for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS # 1&2 80:20 prices plummeted further during the week ended September 18, as per the latest figures from The Steel Index. 

According to TSI, index for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS #1&2 80:20 dropped $9 a ton the week to $160 a ton CFR Taiwanese port. 

Transactions of ISRI grade scrap were very limited as mills are still choosing to buy Japanese origin material, and earlier bookings of Chinese billet have now started to arrive. 

This situation looks set to hold for the foreseeable future, with more expensive ISRI grade scrap unlikely to find a home in Taiwan any time soon.


Price

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#1 Refined Cu
Nov.15
46935.0
-90.0
(-0.19%)
Aluminum Ingot
Nov.15
13920.0
-10.0
(-0.07%)
#1 Lead
Nov.15
15800.0
25.0
(0.16%)
0# Zinc
Nov.15
18490.0
0.0
(0.00%)
#1 Tin Ingot
Nov.15
135250.0
0.0
(0.00%)

Taiwanese containerized scrap import prices plummet to $160 a ton

Industry News 05:56:40PM Sep 21, 2015 Source:SMM

TAIWAN September 21 2015 12:01 PM

TAIPEI (Scrap Register): Prices for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS # 1&2 80:20 prices plummeted further during the week ended September 18, as per the latest figures from The Steel Index. 

According to TSI, index for containerized Taiwanese imports of HMS #1&2 80:20 dropped $9 a ton the week to $160 a ton CFR Taiwanese port. 

Transactions of ISRI grade scrap were very limited as mills are still choosing to buy Japanese origin material, and earlier bookings of Chinese billet have now started to arrive. 

This situation looks set to hold for the foreseeable future, with more expensive ISRI grade scrap unlikely to find a home in Taiwan any time soon.