Turkish HMS 1/2 80:20 Scrap import prices plummet to $227 a ton-Shanghai Metals Market

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Turkish HMS 1/2 80:20 Scrap import prices plummet to $227 a ton

Industry News 09:29:25AM Sep 09, 2015 Source:SMM

TURKEY September 08 2015 5:26 PM

ANKARA (Scrap Register): Turkish HMS 1/2 80:20 scrap import average prices (CFR Iskenderun Port, Turkey) plummeted by $9 a ton week-on-week to $227 a ton in the week ended September 04, as per the latest figures from the Steel Index.

According to TSI, daily benchmark index for deep-sea Turkish imports of HMS #1&2 80:20 fell $15 a ton from last Friday to end the week at $229 a ton CFR Iskenderun port. 

For Live US Scrap Prices Log on to Scrap Register

Momentum in the market has clearly now turned south again, with suppliers holding stocks aplenty and mills having many options, both in terms of supplier and material, with imported billet prices looking attractive. 

Coupled with stable finished steel demand, the falls in pricing that have looked inevitable for a while appear to have come to fruition.

(This article is compiled by Vibin Antony on behalf of Scrap Register. Send in your suggestions and comments to editor@scrapregister.com)


Turkish HMS 1/2 80:20 Scrap import prices plummet to $227 a ton

Industry News 09:29:25AM Sep 09, 2015 Source:SMM

TURKEY September 08 2015 5:26 PM

ANKARA (Scrap Register): Turkish HMS 1/2 80:20 scrap import average prices (CFR Iskenderun Port, Turkey) plummeted by $9 a ton week-on-week to $227 a ton in the week ended September 04, as per the latest figures from the Steel Index.

According to TSI, daily benchmark index for deep-sea Turkish imports of HMS #1&2 80:20 fell $15 a ton from last Friday to end the week at $229 a ton CFR Iskenderun port. 

For Live US Scrap Prices Log on to Scrap Register

Momentum in the market has clearly now turned south again, with suppliers holding stocks aplenty and mills having many options, both in terms of supplier and material, with imported billet prices looking attractive. 

Coupled with stable finished steel demand, the falls in pricing that have looked inevitable for a while appear to have come to fruition.

(This article is compiled by Vibin Antony on behalf of Scrap Register. Send in your suggestions and comments to editor@scrapregister.com)