China Frets over Rising Capital Inflow Pressure-Shanghai Metals Market

Hot Keywords

  • Rare earth
  • Aluminium
  • Macroeconomics
  • Sales data
  • Customs data
  • Copper
  • Inventory data
  • MMi Iron Ore Port Index
  • precious metals
  • Futures movement
  • Zinc
  • Rare earths
  • Tin
  • Market commentary
  • Evening comments

China Frets over Rising Capital Inflow Pressure

Data Analysis 01:03:40PM May 17, 2010 Source:SMM

BEIJING, May 17 -- Capital inflows are placing big pressure on China this year, as domestic companies and banks repatriate large volumes of foreign currency, a senior official said in remarks published on Monday.

Guan Tao, who heads the international balance of payments department at the State Administration of Foreign Exchange , said that ultra-low interest rates in the United States were also fuelling a global dollar carry trade that was channeling more funds to China.

Guan suggested that Chinese players were the main drivers of these flows, looking to take advantage of both yuan appreciation and low US rates.

"Tighter credit controls are prompting domestic companies to raise funds from overseas and then repatriate them, which increases capital inflows," Guan was paraphrased as saying by China Securities Journal.

Guan said Chinese banks were also partly responsible, as they were repatriating foreign reserves to replenish their capital bases.

The mounting inflows could undermine economic stability and required attention from regulators, he said.
 

China Frets over Rising Capital Inflow Pressure

Data Analysis 01:03:40PM May 17, 2010 Source:SMM

BEIJING, May 17 -- Capital inflows are placing big pressure on China this year, as domestic companies and banks repatriate large volumes of foreign currency, a senior official said in remarks published on Monday.

Guan Tao, who heads the international balance of payments department at the State Administration of Foreign Exchange , said that ultra-low interest rates in the United States were also fuelling a global dollar carry trade that was channeling more funds to China.

Guan suggested that Chinese players were the main drivers of these flows, looking to take advantage of both yuan appreciation and low US rates.

"Tighter credit controls are prompting domestic companies to raise funds from overseas and then repatriate them, which increases capital inflows," Guan was paraphrased as saying by China Securities Journal.

Guan said Chinese banks were also partly responsible, as they were repatriating foreign reserves to replenish their capital bases.

The mounting inflows could undermine economic stability and required attention from regulators, he said.